The Legal Academy Orin Kerr

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The Legal Academy is a program on law professors led by Professor Orin Kerr of the University of California, Berkeley Law School. It covers law, the job market, teaching, and everything else that matters to law professors. Every week, there is an interview with a leading law professor. Read more about Orin Kerr at www.OrinKerr.com This article focuses on today`s technology and whether blogging as we know it today is conducive to advancing science. The conclusion of this article is that, compared to other forms of communication, blogs do not provide a particularly good platform for promoting serious jurisprudence. The format of the blog draws the reader`s attention to current thoughts, not deep thoughts. The tyranny of reverse chronological order limits the scientific usefulness of blogs by leading the reader to the newest rather than the best. Orin Kerr is one of the nation`s leading experts on the Fourth Amendment and criminal procedure. He helped found the Computer Crime Division, which explores how traditional legal doctrines should adapt to digital crime and digital evidence. An excellent resource for aspiring lawyers. The Jamal Greene episode was my favorite The second point of this journal is that blogs provide a promising platform for law professors interested in becoming public intellectuals.

Law professors` blogs allow professors to participate in and influence broader debates on law-related issues. This role is not new, but it is an interesting new version of an old role. Blog posts have significant advantages over more traditional forms of public speaking, such as editorials, magazine articles, and TV or radio appearances. Of course, the options are not specific to law professors. Anyone can start a blog, and anyone can use a blog to become a public intellectual. But the legal field is particularly conducive to this type of role, and law professors are well placed to take advantage of it. That doesn`t mean blogging can`t advance science. The impact of a blog depends on what the author publishes. But the format of blogs makes it relatively difficult to maintain an in-depth conversation about an important legal issue. As a result, blogs can play an important role in spreading and critiquing science, but overall, they tend to offer lighter rates than other media.

This article suggests that blogs are likely to have the greatest impact on law at the student level: scholarships published in Law Reviews have often focused on recent developments, and blogs may eventually usurp this role. This week`s guest is Nicola Lacey, Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy at the London School of Economics. This week focuses on legal education in England and how law in England differs from law in the United States. Topics include the structure of legal education, the background and research programmes of British lawyers, and government regulations faced by law professors in England. Music: www.bensound.com I am a 0L thinking about a career as a lawyer. There`s so much gold in this podcast – and not just for people who are considering becoming teachers. Emma Kaufman`s article was by far my favorite, but they are all awesome! Kerr has written more than seventy law articles and his work has been cited more than 4,000 times by other scientists. More than forty of his articles have been cited in court decisions, including eight articles cited in U.S. Supreme Court opinions. He is the author or co-author of several collections of jurisprudence and co-author of the main treatise on criminal procedure. These days, he`s wasting a lot of time on Twitter.

Kerr is a licensed attorney who serves on the bars of California and the District of Columbia. His experience includes briefings and pleadings before the U.S. Supreme Court and three federal counties. He testified before Congress six times and was a member of the Advisory Committee for the Federal Code of Criminal Procedure in appointing Chief Justice Roberts. Prior to attending law school, Kerr earned bachelor`s and master`s degrees in mechanical engineering. He served as a trainee attorney for Judge Leonard I. Garth of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy of the United States Supreme Court. He has also served as a litigator in the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and as the U.S.

Assistant Special Prosecutor in the Eastern District of Virginia. Kerr is the author of more than seventy law review articles, more than half of which have been cited in court opinions (including eight different articles cited in U.S. Supreme Court opinions). He is regularly listed as one of the most cited and influential law professors in the United States. In addition to writing articles on legal insight, Kerr has written popular case books, co-authored the main treatise on criminal cases, and published countless blog posts. Nowadays, he also wastes a lot of time on Twitter. This is the final episode of The Legal Academy, which offers reflections on host Orin Kerr`s season. J.D., magna laude, Harvard Law School, 1997 M.S., Stanford University, 1994 B.S.E., magna laude, Princeton University, 1993 Orin Kerr is William G. Simon Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley.

He specializes in criminal procedure law and computer crime and has also taught courses in criminal law, evidence and professional liability. Orin S. Kerr, Blogs and the Legal Academy, 84 Wash. U. L. Rev. 1127 (2006). Available on: openscholarship.wustl.edu/law_lawreview/vol84/iss5/10.

Prior to academia, Professor Kerr was a litigator in the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Assistant Special Attorney in the Eastern District of Virginia. He received a B.S.E. magna laude in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from Stanford, and a J.D. magna laude from Harvard Law School. He served as a trainee attorney for Judge Leonard I. Garth of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and Justice Anthony M.

Kennedy of the United States Supreme Court. Kerr has argued and argued cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and three federal districts. He has testified six times before congressional committees. From 2013 to 2019, Kerr was a member of the Advisory Committee for the Federal Code of Criminal Procedure through the appointment of Chief Justice Roberts. In 2015, the Chief Justice appointed him to the Criminal Justice Review Committee of the Judicial Conference. Prior to joining Berkeley School of Law, Kerr was a professor at George Washington University School of Law and then at the University of Southern California`s Gould School of Law. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Chicago. A fascinating insight into the minds of those responsible for training future lawyers. Seems particularly topical with the great uncertainty that has suddenly been pushed into the world of education/science.